1952

On June 14th, Pat Summitt is born to parents Richard and Hazel Head.

1974

Pat attends the University of Tennessee at Martin, where she would become an All-American basketball player and a member of the Chi Omega sorority.

1975

Coach Summitt wins her first game as a head coach against Middle Tennessee State University on January 10th, 1975.

1976

Pat is the co-captain of the United States women's national basketball team in the inaugural women's Olympic basketball tournament, where the U.S. won an Olympic silver medal in Montreal.

1983

Pat is the NCAA Coach of the Year and the WBCA Converse Coach of the Year.

1984

Pat becomes the first U.S. Olympian to win an Olympic medal as both a player and head coach, as her team won the Olympic gold medal in Los Angeles.

1987

The Lady Vols wins their 1st NCAA National Championship. The NCAA Coach of the Year and Naismith College Coach of the Year is awarded to Pat.

1989

The Lady Vols win their 2nd NCAA National Championship. For the 2nd time in three years, the NCAA Coach of the Year and Naismith College Coach of the Year is awarded to Pat.

1990

Pat is inducted into the Women's Sports Foundation Hall of Fame. Also, Summitt received the most prestigious award given by the Basketball Hall of Fame, the John Bunn Award. Summitt was the first female to receive the award.

1991

Coach Summitt wins her 3rd National Championship.

1993

Pat is the Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year.

1994

For the 3rd time, Pat is awarded with the NCAA Coach of the Year and Naisith College Coach of the Year.

1994

1994 Coach of the Year by the Touchdown Club of Columbus, Ohio.

1995

Pat is the NCAA Coach of the Year, Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year, and WBCA/Converse Coach of the Year.

1996

Pat wins her 4th National Championship.

1996

Pat is inducted into the National Association for Sport and Physical Education's Hall of Fame and awarded the "Distinguished Citizen of the Year" by the Great Smoky Mountain Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

1997

The Lady Vols win their 5th National Championship despite having 10 losses. Pat is honored at the White House and named one of "25 Most Influential Working Mothers" as selected by Working Mother magazine. 

1998

Pat's team achieved an undefeated season as she won her 6th National Championship. Not surprisingly, Pat again receives the NCAA Coach of the Year, Naismith College Coach of the Year, and the IKON/WBCA Coach of the Year.

1999

Pat is inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, becomes the WISE 1999 Women's of the Year, and receives the ARETE Award for Courage in Sports.

2000

Pat becomes the "Naismith Coach of the 20th Century."

2007

Pat Summitt wins her 7th National Championship. Pat receives the SEC Coach of the Year Award, the "Winged Foot" Award by the New York Athletic Club, and the Dick Enberg Award winner by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

2008

Pat wins her 8th NCAA National Championship. Also, Pat received the John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching Lifetime Achievement Award, the Joe Lapchick Character Award, her second "Winged Foot" Award by the NYAC, and an ESPY.

2009

Pat is awarded with an honorary doctorate from the United States Sports Academy, the WNBA Inspiring Coach Award, and the RUSSELL ATHLETIC/WBCA Victory Club Award for 1,000 career wins.

2011

Pat is honored with the 2011 Sportswoman of the Year alongside Sportsman of the Year, Duke's Mike Krzyzewski. Pat receives the Maggie Dixon Courage Award, the Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias Courage Award by The U.S. Sports Academy.

2012

Coach Summitt wins her 1,098th game against Kansas on March 24th, 2012.

2012

The ESPY's Arthur Ashe Courage Award is awarded to Pat by Peyton Manning in Los Angeles.

2012

President Obama presents Pat with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

2012

After coaching 38 years at one University, Pat ends her career by never missing a NCAA tournament, reaching 18 Final Fours, and most importantly to her, achieving a 100% graduation rate for her 161 student-athletes.

2012

President Obama presents Pat with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Pat also received an ESPY for the Arthur Ashe Courage Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the President's Council.

2013

After retirement, Pat is inducted into the FIBA Hall of Fame. Also, Pat receives the AARP Andrus Lifetime Achievement Award, the Mannie Jackson - Basketball Human Spirit Award, the Keith Jackson Eternal Flame Award presented by CoSIDA, and others.

2016

Pat is the only woman on Sporting News' list of "Top 50 US Coaches of All Time" at #13.

2017

On January 15th, the Pat Summitt Clinic is opened with a vision to help patients, families, and caregivers who struggle with Alzheimer's.

2018

The Pat Summitt Leadership Group is born in order to preserve Pat's legacy through publication, education, and film. 

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On June 14th, Pat Summitt is born to parents Richard and Hazel Head.

Pat attends the University of Tennessee at Martin, where she would become an All-American basketball player and a member of the Chi Omega sorority.

Coach Summitt wins her first game as a head coach against Middle Tennessee State University on January 10th, 1975.

Pat is the co-captain of the United States women's national basketball team in the inaugural women's Olympic basketball tournament, where the U.S. won an Olympic silver medal in Montreal.

Pat is the NCAA Coach of the Year and the WBCA Converse Coach of the Year.

Pat becomes the first U.S. Olympian to win an Olympic medal as both a player and head coach, as her team won the Olympic gold medal in Los Angeles.

The Lady Vols wins their 1st NCAA National Championship. The NCAA Coach of the Year and Naismith College Coach of the Year is awarded to Pat.

The Lady Vols win their 2nd NCAA National Championship. For the 2nd time in three years, the NCAA Coach of the Year and Naismith College Coach of the Year is awarded to Pat.

Pat is inducted into the Women's Sports Foundation Hall of Fame. Also, Summitt received the most prestigious award given by the Basketball Hall of Fame, the John Bunn Award. Summitt was the first female to receive the award.

Coach Summitt wins her 3rd National Championship.

Pat is the Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year.

For the 3rd time, Pat is awarded with the NCAA Coach of the Year and Naisith College Coach of the Year.

1994 Coach of the Year by the Touchdown Club of Columbus, Ohio.

Pat is the NCAA Coach of the Year, Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year, and WBCA/Converse Coach of the Year.

Pat wins her 4th National Championship.

Pat is inducted into the National Association for Sport and Physical Education's Hall of Fame and awarded the "Distinguished Citizen of the Year" by the Great Smoky Mountain Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

The Lady Vols win their 5th National Championship despite having 10 losses. Pat is honored at the White House and named one of "25 Most Influential Working Mothers" as selected by Working Mother magazine. 

Pat's team achieved an undefeated season as she won her 6th National Championship. Not surprisingly, Pat again receives the NCAA Coach of the Year, Naismith College Coach of the Year, and the IKON/WBCA Coach of the Year.

Pat is inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, becomes the WISE 1999 Women's of the Year, and receives the ARETE Award for Courage in Sports.

Pat becomes the "Naismith Coach of the 20th Century."

Pat Summitt wins her 7th National Championship. Pat receives the SEC Coach of the Year Award, the "Winged Foot" Award by the New York Athletic Club, and the Dick Enberg Award winner by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

Pat wins her 8th NCAA National Championship. Also, Pat received the John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching Lifetime Achievement Award, the Joe Lapchick Character Award, her second "Winged Foot" Award by the NYAC, and an ESPY.

Pat is awarded with an honorary doctorate from the United States Sports Academy, the WNBA Inspiring Coach Award, and the RUSSELL ATHLETIC/WBCA Victory Club Award for 1,000 career wins.

Pat is honored with the 2011 Sportswoman of the Year alongside Sportsman of the Year, Duke's Mike Krzyzewski. Pat receives the Maggie Dixon Courage Award, the Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias Courage Award by The U.S. Sports Academy.

Coach Summitt wins her 1,098th game against Kansas on March 24th, 2012.

The ESPY's Arthur Ashe Courage Award is awarded to Pat by Peyton Manning in Los Angeles.

President Obama presents Pat with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

After coaching 38 years at one University, Pat ends her career by never missing a NCAA tournament, reaching 18 Final Fours, and most importantly to her, achieving a 100% graduation rate for her 161 student-athletes.

President Obama presents Pat with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Pat also received an ESPY for the Arthur Ashe Courage Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the President's Council.

After retirement, Pat is inducted into the FIBA Hall of Fame. Also, Pat receives the AARP Andrus Lifetime Achievement Award, the Mannie Jackson - Basketball Human Spirit Award, the Keith Jackson Eternal Flame Award presented by CoSIDA, and others.

Pat is the only woman on Sporting News' list of "Top 50 US Coaches of All Time" at #13.

On January 15th, the Pat Summitt Clinic is opened with a vision to help patients, families, and caregivers who struggle with Alzheimer's.

The Pat Summitt Leadership Group is born in order to preserve Pat's legacy through publication, education, and film. 

Coach of the Century

Pat Summitt

Pat Summitt was truly a “one of a kind,” legendary American treasure and was recognized for her accomplishments in every area of life. President Barack Obama honored her with the “Medal of Freedom.” She was the recipient of the Sports Illustrated “Sportswoman of the Year” Award and Glamour magazine’s “Woman of the Year” recognition. ESPN awarded Pat the prestigious “Arthur Ashe Courage Award.”  US News and World Report named her one of the top fifty women leaders in America. Alongside her male counterpart, John Wooden, Pat received the Naismith Coach of the Century award. In 2016, Sporting News ranked the 50 All-Time Greatest American Sports Coaches (of all sports) and had Pat, not surprisingly, as the only female on the list.  The White House even named her one of the “Twenty-Five Most Influential Working Mothers.” Pat was also the first US Olympian to win medals as both a player (1976) and head coach (1984). She coached the University of Tennessee for 38 years, won 8 national championships and proudly had a 100% student-athlete graduation rate.  She won 1,098 games, went to 18 NCAA “Final Fours,” never missed a NCAA tournament, won 32 SEC Championships and was awarded “Coach of the Year” 15 times. When she retired, she was the all-time winningest coach in NCAA basketball history. But clearly, hers is not just the story about a basketball coach. She wrote three best-selling books, performed countless corporate keynote speeches, and started the Pat Summitt Foundation, a nonprofit focused on fighting Alzheimer’s disease. Her life, legend, legacy and leadership lessons will continue for decades through the work of both the Pat Summitt Foundation and the Pat Summitt Leadership Group.

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